Answers to Questions Posted by “Father Time” at Birther Report

I decided to promote my comment on the Ah’Nee article to a full post. I may add to this as time permits.

Father Time at Birther Report asks:

The Xerox Workcenter 7655 machine I have hear so much about but some questions have never been answer.

1-How do we know the WH even has one?
2-If they do have one how does anyone know it was use in the coping [sic] Obama’s BC?
3-One place call [sic] it a 7655 link to RC and another was 7535 @ Dr. Conspiracy do Obots just make up numbers?
4-Do all Xerox scanners do this? If so Xerox may be sued .

Since BR will never let a comment through from me I will answer Father Time’s questions here.

  1. We know the White House has Xerox WorkCentre equipment in use because at least two documents posted at the White House web site show XeroxWorkCentre models in the metadata. The Obama and Biden tax returns published a few days before the LFBC was released in 2011 show that the creator is a Xerox WorkCentre 7655. Another document posted on the site a few weeks later was scanned on a WorkCentre 7765. Finally, government web sites list Xerox as a supplier of office equipment to the Executive Office of the President in the same time frame.
  2. A number of factors clearly show the original scan was done on a Xerox WorkCentre and then resaved in Preview on a Mac. The compression artifacts and layering are identical to similar documents scanned on WorkCentres and the JPG has a comment tag of “YCbCr” that is found on all the other color scans that we have seen that were  produced on Xerox WorkCentres.
  3. No these are real models that NBC and I have used to scan real documents. Check the Xerox web site for a full list of models. Unlike Birthers we have no need to make up stuff.
  4. NBC has done testing on a Xerox WorkCentre 7655 and I have done testing on two different models, a WorkCentre 7535 and 7435. They generate very similar PDF’s with the same artifacts. It only makes sense that Xerox would use the same compression algorithm in the entire line.

    The “YCbCr” comment tag is another clue that the same algorithm is used in the entire WorkCentre line. When a problem was discovered with the JBIG2 algorithm (it was noted that it  wrongly scanned a number in rare cases) Xerox listed the full line of WorkCentre products as having the same bug.

    Sue Xerox for what reasons? Why would anyone sue Xerox because a bunch of lunatics do not understand image compression?

[Updated 2/24/14: An RC Radio hat tip to Thomas B. for editorial suggestions.]

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40 Responses to Answers to Questions Posted by “Father Time” at Birther Report

  1. Matt says:

    Why don’t birthers get this one simple concept?

    It does not matter at all what model was used. It doesn’t even matter that it was a Xerox. What matters is that Grand Admiral Zullo and the rest of his clown posse claimed the artifacts in the WH LFBC could only have been created by a human, NOT by a machine. All it takes is proof that ONE machine can produce those artifacts, and you have done that quite well.

  2. Does the Ah’Nee Birth Certificate scan contain the YCbCr tag?

  3. Hermitian says:

    Two additional non-Xerox PDF files containing the YCbCr label have been found. Unless refuted, these PDFs provide evidence proving that the label cannot be exclusive to Xerox. The additional PDfs are one in Japanese found here:

    http://www.izuskyline-cc.co.jp/redxisusinia.html

    and the other in Chinese located here:

    http://sdfy.shunde.gov.cn/data/2014/01/17/1389947357.pdf

    Each of these two PDFs were both created and produced by CIP1.5. The creation date/time and production date/time are identical in each file. Both files utilize the same Quantization and Huffman tables as the Xerox print to PDF files. The monochrome 1 Bit images are all CCITT compressed. The JPEG image on each page of each file is singly compressed with JPEG DCT. Neither file has the added clipping mask. The YCbCr label is visible in each PDF file. All of the layers in each file are in correct portrait orientation when opened in Adobe Illustrator CC, Adobe Acrobat XI Pro, and Adobe Photoshop CC. The rotation angles are zero as read out in Illustrator CC.

    The creator/producer CIP1.5 was a product released by FatWire in 2009.

    FatWire Content Integration Platform 1.5 puts enterprise content stored in disparate repositories at the fingertips of web managers, so that they can easily access the content they need to make websites rich and compelling. The FatWire Content Integration Platform delivers flexibility for custom integrations plus greater enterprise controls for content sharing. http://www.fatwire.com.

    Fatwire was acquired by Oracle in Apr. 2011.

  4. Hermitian says:

    Here’s the METADATA from the Japanese PDF

    Here’s the full data:

    XMP

    Producer CIP1.5
    XMP Toolkit XMP Core 4.1.1
    Create Date 2013:12:25 17:23:12-05:00
    2 months, 18 days, 15 hours, 35 minutes, 50 seconds ago
    Modify Date 2014:03:07 08:01:20-05:00
    6 days, 57 minutes, 42 seconds ago
    Creator Tool CIP1.5
    Format application/pdf

    File — basic information derived from the file.

    File Type JPEG
    File Type PDF
    MIME Type application/pdf
    MIME Type image/jpeg
    Comment YCbCr
    Encoding Process Baseline DCT, Huffman coding
    Bits Per Sample 8
    Color Components 3
    File Size 134 kB
    Y Cb Cr Sub Sampling YCbCr4:2:0 (2 2)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    Image Size 1,653 × 2,338

    PDF

    PDF Version 1.4
    Linearized No
    Creator CIP1.5
    Producer CIP1.5
    PXC Viewer Info PDF-XChange Viewer;2.5.211.0;Jun 17 2013;09:19:35;D:20140307080120-05’00’
    Embedded Image Color Space DeviceRGB
    Embedded Image (96,758 bytes binary data)
    Embedded Image Width 1,653
    Embedded Image Width 2,662
    Embedded Image Filter DCTDecode
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Height 2,338
    Embedded Image Height 2,807
    Embedded Image Width 437
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Height 442
    Embedded Image Width 1,831
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Height 327
    Embedded Image Width 2,656
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Height 730
    Embedded Image Width 618
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Height 75
    Embedded Image Width 465
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Height 75
    Embedded Image Width 494
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Height 67
    Embedded Image Width 41
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Height 75
    Embedded Image Width 47
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Height 75
    Page Count 1
    Create Date 2013:12:26 07:23:12+09:00
    2 months, 18 days, 15 hours, 35 minutes, 51 seconds ago
    Modify Date 2014:03:07 08:01:20-05:00
    6 days, 57 minutes, 43 seconds ago

  5. Hermitian says:

    Likewise here is the METADATA extracted from the Chinese PDF.

    Here’s the full data:

    File — basic information derived from the file.

    File Size 352 kB
    File Type PDF
    File Type JPEG
    MIME Type application/pdf
    MIME Type image/jpeg
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type JPEG
    MIME Type image/jpeg
    Comment YCbCr
    Encoding Process Baseline DCT, Huffman coding
    Bits Per Sample 8
    Color Components 3
    Y Cb Cr Sub Sampling YCbCr4:2:0 (2 2)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type JPEG
    MIME Type image/jpeg
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type (unsupported)
    File Type JPEG
    Image Size 1,240 × 1,753
    MIME Type image/jpeg
    File Type (unsupported)

    PDF

    PDF Version 1.3
    Linearized No
    Page Count 4
    Embedded Image Color Space DeviceRGB, DeviceRGB, DeviceRGB, DeviceRGB
    Embedded Image Width 1,240
    Embedded Image Width 1,822
    Embedded Image Height 1,753
    Embedded Image Height 691
    Embedded Image Filter DCTDecode
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 1,824
    Embedded Image Height 363
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 477
    Embedded Image Height 372
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 541
    Embedded Image Height 288
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 237
    Embedded Image Height 252
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 429
    Embedded Image Height 125
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 645
    Embedded Image Height 69
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 76
    Embedded Image Height 107
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 240
    Embedded Image Height 109
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 183
    Embedded Image Height 128
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 132
    Embedded Image Height 249
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 170
    Embedded Image Height 169
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 292
    Embedded Image Height 165
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 448
    Embedded Image Height 223
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 253
    Embedded Image Height 269
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 75
    Embedded Image Height 102
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 113
    Embedded Image Height 82
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 56
    Embedded Image Height 104
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 67
    Embedded Image Height 85
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 37
    Embedded Image Height 65
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 58
    Embedded Image Height 52
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 46
    Embedded Image Height 31
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 129
    Embedded Image Height 135
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 147
    Embedded Image Height 95
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 36
    Embedded Image Height 50
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 29
    Embedded Image Height 47
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 99
    Embedded Image Height 67
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image (95,217 bytes binary data)
    Embedded Image (46,569 bytes binary data)
    Embedded Image Width 1,816
    Embedded Image Height 2,259
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 1,549
    Embedded Image Height 228
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 221
    Embedded Image Height 406
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image (44,889 bytes binary data)
    Embedded Image Width 1,817
    Embedded Image Height 2,531
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 99
    Embedded Image Height 195
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 95
    Embedded Image Height 188
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 80
    Embedded Image Height 147
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 399
    Embedded Image Height 400
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 65
    Embedded Image Height 67
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image Width 53
    Embedded Image Height 64
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Embedded Image (34,945 bytes binary data)
    Embedded Image Width 1,840
    Embedded Image Height 228
    Embedded Image Filter CCITTFaxDecode
    Create Date 2013:12:12 09:27:32+08:00
    3 months, 1 day, 12 hours, 37 minutes, 56 seconds ago
    Modify Date 2013:12:12 09:27:32+08:00
    3 months, 1 day, 12 hours, 37 minutes, 56 seconds ago
    Creator CIP1.5
    Producer CIP1.5

    • I have no clue why you are wasting your time on this Hermie. Even your own research shows these likely touched a Xerox WorkCentre at some point and the exclusivity of the “YCBCR” comment tag to Xerox was never at the heart of any claim. The point is that 1) it is exceeding rare to find it. How many pdfs did your scour through to find your two? 2) It is found in every pdf known to have originated on a Xerox Workcentre. Once again you demonstrate you have no critical thinking skills.

      • Hermitian says:

        Reality Check says:

        March 13, 2014 at 9:55 am

        “I have no clue why you are wasting your time on this Hermie. Even your own research shows these likely touched a Xerox WorkCentre at some point and the exclusivity of the “YCBCR” comment tag to Xerox was never at the heart of any claim. The point is that 1) it is exceeding rare to find it. How many pdfs did your scour through to find your two? 2) It is found in every pdf known to have originated on a Xerox Workcentre. Once again you demonstrate you have no critical thinking skills.”

        Did it ever occur to you that if your claim that the YCbCr label is inserted into every image scanned on a Xerox Workstation were true then there would necessarily be a gazillion images (JPEG + PDF) containing this label all over the internet? But even you admit that these images are “exceedingly rare” ! I agree, there are only a handful.

        So what happened to the gazillion other images that were scanned on the thousands of Xerox Workcenters that are out there?

        You don’t have a clue ?

        I thought so…

        • Actually, every color PDF that NBC found on the Internet identified with metadata tying it to a XeroxCentre had it. Every color scan scan NBC and I have done on Xerox WorkCentres contained it. How many do you need to see before you conclude that yep, color scans from Xerox WorkCentre’s contain the “YCBCR” tag? Why don’t you go through the effort of finding a Xerox WorkCentre model such as a 7535 or 7655 and run your own experiments then get back to us?

          • Northland10 says:

            Hermie has gotten so obsessed in proving you and NBC did something wrong, he has forgotten the original premiss. The previous claim was that certain features were not possible by normal scanning. You and the others demonstrates that it was with equipment known to be used in the White House.

            Hermie, whether done by Cannon, Samsung or Xerox, the point remains that scanners can create features found in the LFBC. Your quest for the tag does has no relevance.

            • Hermie is the king of building strawmen of his own creation. He knows he has lost and that is all he has left.

            • Hermitian says:

              The previous claim was that certain features were not possible by normal scanning.

              If by normal scanning you mean placing the original up-side-down in landscape mode on the Xerox and then rotating the image 180 degrees in MAC OS Preview before resaving the PDF. Which purportedly replaced the Xerox Metadata with Preview Metadata.

              The two Asian PDF images that I posted were scanned in right-side-up portrait orientation with zero subsequent rotations.

              The PDF creator (and producer) was CIP1.5. The Created date/time and the Modified date/time are identical in both Asian documents. There were only DCT and CCITT compression filters in both PDFs. The JPEG background layers were not doubly compressed.

              Of course the three Amigos claim that only the Xerox forger in the White House could have done the deed.

          • Hermitian says:

            Actually, every color PDF that NBC found on the Internet identified with metadata tying it to a XeroxCentre had it. Every color scan scan NBC and I have done on Xerox WorkCentres contained it. How many do you need to see before you conclude that yep, color scans from Xerox WorkCentre’s contain the YCBCR” tag?

            You didn’t answer my question. Where are all he millions of other images that were scanned on a Xerox workcenter and uploaded to the internet?

            Also where are all the ones that were scanned on the White House Xerox Workcenters and then
            uploaded to the WH web site ? You and all your other Obot chorus have found only two or three. There should be many more. So where are they?

            • Who says there are millions? The scan to email function on the Xerox WorkCentres (and every other similar large office machine these days) is used to scan documents that are emailed around within companies. We have found lots of documents posted on the web that originated from Xerox WorkCentre’s by searching for the default Xerox file name. Documents posted on the web are not often scans of paper documents. To maintain quality web documents are maintained in original electronic format rather than scanning paper. SCRIBD has a lot of scanned documents but they are reprocessed from posting them on SCRIBD. I am sure if one did a painstaking search on the web and downloaded every document to examine the meta data you would find thousands of scanned documents. It sounds like a good project to keep you busy Hermie. Frankly, I have proven my point and moved on.

            • W. Kevin Vicklund says:

              Actually dozens have been found (I even found some at work). We stopped looking after a while, since they all told the same story.

              • Hermitian says:

                W. Kevin Vicklund says:

                March 13, 2014 at 5:40 pm

                Actually dozens have been found (I even found some at work). We stopped looking after a while, since they all told the same story.<If so then it should be easy for you to find one with the attributes of the two Asian PDFs that I posted. These were close to letter size, had been scanned in right side up portrait orientation and required no rotations of the image in Illustrator, Acrobat, Photoshop, PDFXChange Viewer, or Adobe Reader.

                Every layer image within each document was embedded in the right side up portrait orientation in each PDF.

                The JPEG background layers were singly compressed by DCT and all the 1 Bit monochrome images were compressed with CCITTFAX.

                So if you are right, then it should be like falling off a log for you to find just one Xerox PDF like these two non-Xerox Asian PDFs.

                • I think Hermie messed up the quote function on this one. LOL I have no idea what he is rambling on about.

                • Hermitian says:

                  Reality Check says:

                  March 13, 2014 at 6:58 pm

                  “I think Hermie messed up the quote function on this one. LOL I have no idea what

                  Stupid says:

                  Don’t you wish that this blog had the comment edit feature ? Then you wouldn’t have to clean up the mess…

                • It seems to be working fine now Hermie.

                • This is a free WordPress.com blog. Unfortunately, it does not allow anyone except an admin to edit comments. If it had one I would turn it on. If I went to a hosted WordPress.org blog I believe there are comment editors available. I have no plans to do that. If people are nice to me I would consider editing a comment for them if they email me any corrections. I don’t do that for people who call me a liar and do not engage in honest discussion.

                • Hermitian says:

                  “This is a free WordPress.com blog. Unfortunately, it does not allow anyone except an admin to edit comments.”So you lied before when you complained about having to clean up my posts containing the following logical separator?

                  HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
                  Oops !!!…

                • I think I did it on one or two posts back when anyone actually cared about what you wrote. No one does any longer.

                • Hermitian says:

                  RC

                  “I think I did it on one or two posts back when anyone actually cared about what you wrote. No one does any longer.”

                  HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
                  So which is it? You actually did clean up my posts or you don’t have the privilege to do so?

                • As the admin I can edit any comment if I wish.

            • W. Kevin Vicklund says:

              Start off by doing a google search on “device001.pdf”. That will get you several thousand Xerox pdfs (perhaps over 100,000). Have fun analyzing them!

              • Thanks Kevin. I thought Hermie could figure that out for himself but I forgot with whom we are dealing. I got 137,000 results. That should keep him buys for a while.

                • Hermitian says:

                  Reality Check commented on Answers to Questions Posted by “Father Time” at Birther Report.

                  “”in response to W. Kevin Vicklund:

                  “”Start off by doing a google search on “device001.pdf”. That will get you several thousand Xerox pdfs (perhaps over 100,000). Have fun analyzing them!

                  “Thanks Kevin. I thought Hermie could figure that out for himself but I forgot with whom we are dealing. I got 137,000 results. That should keep him buys for a while.”

                  Then it should
                  no sweat for you two to find just one that’s got the same stuff as the two Asian PDFs that I found and posted.

                • Why should we do that? Why don’t you go through a few thousand results of the Google search that Kevin referenced and see if they have the “YCbCr” comment if they are color scans? Report back to us in a few months. 😆

          • Hermitian says:

            Reality Check says:

            March 13, 2014 at 12:55 pm

            Actually, every color PDF that NBC found on the Internet identified with metadata tying it to a XeroxCentre had it. Every color scan scan NBC and I have done on Xerox WorkCentres contained it. How many do you need to see before you conclude that yep, color scans from Xerox WorkCentre’s contain the “YCBCR” tag?

            You and NBC combined have released exactly two files from trial scans which you claim were done on the Xerox 7535. NBC also posted some printouts which he claimed were from scans on a Xerox 7655. These two NBC files had different quantization tables in the JPEG.

            The absence of evidence is evidence…

  6. Hermitian says:

    Looks like RC has screwed up his comment editor. It’s now eating plain text characters. You don’t suppose ….. Naw ! He would never compress comments with JBIG2!

  7. Hermitian says:

    WKV

    I tried your search on “device001.pdf.

    Here was my first hit.

    http://www.cer.ie/docs/000697/cer13011.pdf

    The PDF MetaData contains the following Title:

    “(Scanned from a Xerox multifunction device001.pdf)”

    I took a look and found out that this one does not contain the “YCbCr” label. I’m sure you will claim that it did originally but Adobe wiped out the label and converted the YCbCr to CMYK.

    By the way, the colors are reversed on the extracted JPEG in Photoshop.

    ROTFL…

    • W. Kevin Vicklund says:

      Since it looks like it was converted to PostScript using Acrobat and then converted back to PDF by GhostScript (based on the metadata, which is as always rather limited in what it can tell us about the file history), there’s a very good chance that it did so. In fact, I bet if you took one of the 7535 files and converted it to PostScript using the manufacturer default Acrobat settings, you’ll find that the JPEG in the PostScript file is now CMYK. But you already knew that, didn’t you…

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